Facebook wants Australians' nude images to fight revenge porn

Facebook is asking users to upload nudes to stop revenge porn online

Facebook is asking users to upload nudes to stop revenge porn online

They will then be asked to send the pictures they are concerned about to themselves on Messenger while the e-safety commissioner's office notifies Facebook of their submission.

Julie Inman Grant, Australia's e-Safety commissioner, said Facebook would not permanently store the images, only their digital fingerprints, which are capable of blocking further attempts to upload the pictures but can not be decoded to produce the images themselves.

So if a relationship goes sour, you could take proactive steps to prevent any intimate images in possession of your former love interest from being shared widely on Facebook or Instagram.

All one has got to do is to contact Australia's e-Safety Commissioner (since right now they are trying this in Australia) if they're anxious about the fact that their images might get leaked.

"We would expect that Facebook has absolutely watertight systems to guard the privacy of victims".

The new system is very much in its infancy and Facebook assures all users that none of the images are stored.

Grant sought to allay concerns of users about what Facebook would do with the photos they upload.

In April, Facebook announced an algorithm that uses one sample photo to identify similar photos and remove them from the social media platform.

Users wanting to take part in the trial must first file a report with the commissioner, who will in turn share it with Facebook.

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PixabayHow does this anti Revenge Porn tool work?

Roughly 4% of US internet users have been victims of revenge porn, according to a 2016 report from the Data & Society Research Institute.

Facebook is no stranger to revenge porn and explicit content, which is banned on the platform.

Hany Farid, a professor of computer science at Dartmouth who helped develop PhotoDNA, described Facebook's pilot as a "terrific idea".

But one expert says there will still be problems outside Facebook and related sites such as WhatsApp and Instagram.

Clarifying on its plans, Facebook said it would hash the image which essentially means creating a digital footprint of the image.

"They're not storing the image, they're storing the link and using artificial intelligence and other photo-matching technologies", Grant explained.

Will Facebook in the USA get this technology?

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